How to Legally Fly Drones at a Concert

Drones are being used more and more to document outdoor concerts and music festivals all over the world. The aerial footage can provide a fresh view of a familiar event. But there are some tips that drone pilots should know before planning to fly these types of gatherings.

First and foremost, be sure to partner with event organizers if you plan to fly drones at a concert or festival. Most...

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Drones are being used more and more to document outdoor concerts and music festivals all over the world. The aerial footage can provide a fresh view of a familiar event. But there are some tips that drone pilots should know before planning to fly these types of gatherings.

First and foremost, be sure to partner with event organizers if you plan to fly drones at a concert or festival. Most events will hire a pilot or production company and work with them to determine what footage should be taken. Flying a drone at a concert or festival without prior permission is highly discouraged and could lead to a variety of problems.

Once the proper permission has been obtained, map out safe locations on-site from which to take off and land drones from during the event. It’s important to have a designated area for drone operations that is far away from crowds or other equipment that could interfere with safe drone flights. And always be sure to choose flight paths that will avoid flying over people or crowds — which is illegal in most countries, including the United States.

There are many safe and creative ways to capture great footage at concerts without flying over the crowd. Flying over buildings near stages allows drones to get close to the action while remaining legal. Using a zoom lens, like the 50 millimeter Zenmuse X7 camera on the DJI Inspire 2, also gives the appearance of being closer to the action while maintaining a safe distance. That is what AirVuz did during the Basilica Block Party in Minneapolis, Minnesota, as the official aerial footage providers for the event.

AirVuz has filmed other music festivals, such as Air + Style in Los Angeles and the Zombie Pub Crawl in Minneapolis. Drone pilots from around the world have used their quadcopters to document the action from other events like Burning Man, the LIT Festival in Colombia, and much more.

With drones continuing to increase in popularity while decreasing in price, expect to see drones being used even more to take footage of large-scale events like these.

For more information, contact Tyler Mason, Director of Public Relations, at tyler@airvuz.com.

About AirVuz

Since its launch in 2015, AirVuz has become the world’s leading drone video and photography sharing platform and global community for drone pilots and aerial media enthusiasts. Drone enthusiasts worldwide can upload and share videos and photos in unlimited quantity and at no cost. Site users have free access to an ever-growing library of drone media content including easily browsable categories such as travel, extreme sports, golf courses, drone racing, landmarks and more. AirVuz users also have access to original AirVuz content, including the weekly AirVuz News program, profiles of top content creators, product reviews, and how-to information for drone pilots on how to take and edit high quality drone video.